Saturday, 9 August 2008

August comment thread

For general comments and questions related to Malvaceae from anyone.

9 comments:

Peter Jack said...

Lavatera 'Barnsley' is, I believe,notoriously short-lived; I have never kept a plant for more than three years.

Do you know if 'Blushing Bride'(which seems to have petals of a better shape) may live for longer? Or perhaps better cultivation may extend their lives?

Lavateraguy said...

Lavatera x clementii in general has a reputation for being short lived, but I have seen plants that have survived for many years.

I have kept 'Barnsley' going for longer than 3 years, even though I have less that ideal conditions. I haven't found 'Blushing Bride' to be any more robust. Last year, when my collection was adversely effected by waterlogging after summer flood, I lost more of the latter.

'Blushing Bride's unique selling point is that the flowers don't turn pink with age - other Barnsley pattern cultivars do to various degrees. It's bad point is that it's has a bad tendency - much worse than 'Barnsley' - to revert to a 'Rosea' like form.

Peejay said...

Many thanks for the warning -I'll stear clear of L.'Blushing Bride I think. Pity, I think the petals look neater; not all wrinkled at the edges.

Many thanks,
Peejay

Peejay said...

I am particularly interested in lavateras, and also the rest of the
Malvaceae. Do you mind if I ask your advice from time to time?

Sincerely,
Peejay

Lavateraguy said...

Do you mind if I ask your advice from time to time?

Of course I don't mind. If I did I wouldn't be allowing comments.

You might also be interested in the Malvaceae email list.

Are you interested in exchanging seed?

peejay said...

Dear 'L.G.',
Sorry for delay answering; I have had really sore 'computer eyes' for a couple of weeks.

Re seed exchange: I do not have any unusual plants for seed. My garden is too small for trialling plants.

Peter Jack said...

Actually that is what I wanted to ask you -in your plant trials have you discovered any unusual species with spectacular flowers which might do well in Cornwall?

At present I have Abutilon suntense 'Violetta' (which I have found to be often short-lived), Alyogyne heugelii 'Santa Cruz'(almost hardy in Cornwall but few flowers) and Lavatera bicolor(the best and most reliable mallow
I have grown).

I have heard there is a form of L. bicolor with pinker flowers than the one usually for sale. Is this possible to obtain?

Sincerely,

Peter Jack

Lavateraguy said...

The only other form (or possibly hybrid) of Lavatera maritima that is available is Lavatera 'Princesse de Lignes', but as far as I can tell (and assuming the plant I bought wasn't mislabelled) this is indistinguishable from Lavatera 'Bicolor'.

I'm a little surprised that there are the only two clones in circulation.

Wild forms of Lavatera maritima, as inferred from photographs on the web, are often pinker. You can buy seed from Rare Plants.

peejay said...

Recently I saw a superb picture of Alyogyne heugelii growing in ideal conditions. It had a pleasing,loose rounded habit of growth and was smothered with flowers.
It must be one of the most attractive shrubs there is -if you can grow it. I have a specimen that has survived outdoors in Cornwall for six years now, but it has been smothered by a Cytisus 'Porlock' -the very plant which was protecting it.
Inspired by the photo, I have decided to plant another, and to give it more space to grow to its
natural shape. I will protect it with fleece when necessary.
I'll let you know how it progresses.
Sincerely,
Peter Jack